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b this country. he was the naacp's first field secretary in mississippi. he had fought for his country in world war ii. before coming home to fight for justice here. his assassination by a white supremacist in june of 1963 helped to inspire the march on washington. joining me now is myrlie evers williams, the widow of medgar evers and a legendary civil rights leader in her own right. and historian taylor branch author of the trilogy of books on dr. king and the civil rights movement. thank you both for being on tonight. >> it's a pleasure. >> thank you. >> let me start with you ms. evers williams. your husband was killed in june of '63, and it was part of what really ignited the movement that had already started around having this march. you were the speaker at that march and didn't make it. and one of the things we're most proud of is tomorrow you're going to make that speech at lincoln memorial for the march on washington. >> well, thank you. >> 50 years later. >> thank you ever so much. >> tell us what was running through your mind as you fought in mississippi and the climat
of their dignity by signs stating "for whites only." we cannot be satisfied as long as a negro in mississippi cannot vote and a negro in new york believes he has nothing for which to vote. no, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream. i am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. you have been the veterans of creative suffering. continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive. go back to mississippi, go back to alabama, go back to south carolina, go back to georgia, go back to the louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. let us not wallow in the valley of despair. i say to you today, my friends, so even though we face the difficulties of today and t
be satisfied as long as the negro in mississippi cannot vote and the negro in new york believes he has nothing for which to vote. no, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream. i am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. some of you have come fresh from narrow jail cells. some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution, and staggered by the winds of police brutality. you have been the veterans of creative suffering. continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redementive. go back to mississippi. go back to alabama. go back to south carolina. go back to georgia, go back to louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities. knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. let us not wallow in the valley of despair. i say to you today, my friend friends -- [ cheers and applause ] >> -- though even though we face the difficulties of today and tomorrow i still hav
trying to change b this country. he was the naacp's first field secretary in mississippi. he had fought for his country in world war ii. before coming home to fight for justice here. his assassination by a white supremacist in june of 1963 helped to inspire the march on washington. joining me now is myrlie evers williams, the widow of medgar evers and a legendary civil rights leader in her own right. and historian taylor branch author of the trilogy of books on dr. king and the civil rights movement. thank you both for being on tonight. >> it's a pleasure. >> thank you. >> let me start with you ms. evers williams. your husband was killed in june of '63, and it was part of what really ignited the movement that had already started around having this march. you were the speaker at that march and didn't make it. and one of the things we're most proud of is tomorrow you're going to make that speech at lincoln memorial for the march on washington. >> well, thank you. >> 50 years later. >> thank you ever so much. >> tell us what was running through your mind as you fought in mississippi and th
times" about growing up with their single moms in mississippi and making the tough choice to go off to harvard and yale. yes, for them it was a very different choice than it is for most students. it wasn't an easy thing to do. you'll hear their stories coming up. go anywhere in the world, but you had to leave right now, would you go? man: 'oh i can't go tonight' woman: 'i can't.' hero : that's what expedia asked me. host: book the flight but you have to go right now. hero: (laughs) and i just go? this is for real right? this is for real? i always said one day i'd go to china, just never thought it'd be today. anncr: we're giving away a trip every day. download the expedia app and your next trip could be on us. expedia, find yours. from capital one... boris earns unlimited rewards for his small business. can i get the smith contract, please? thank you. that's three new paper shredders. [ boris ] put 'em on my spark card. [ garth ] boris' small business earns 2% cash back on every purchase every day. great businesses deserve unlimited rewards. read back the chicken's testimony, please
. the sad thing when i was in the georgia legislature we used to say thank god for mississippi because mississippi was always worse than georgia. now we have to say thank god for north carolina because north carolina has become the new mississippi. >> you know, brian, let's talk about north carolina. north carolina up until recently was seen as a sort of a bastion of progressism of the south. yet north carolina now is not exactly a bastion of anything progressive. >> no. i think that's right. one of the scary things for people who are committed to civil rights in this country is that the pace of which we have retreated from basic protections. what i'm most concerned about is these legislatures a lot of them in the south and other parts of the country actually take pride in their resistance to responding to the challenges that face people of color, that face the poor, that face the disadvantaged. they are proud of the fact that they are creating barriers to voting. in north carolina there was something called the racial justice act that was design to deal with the horrific disparities w
, and areas that are in mississippi and alabama, as much as six to ten inches of rain over the next five days, enough to cause flooding concerns. mara's already complained offair but it's a chilly morning in the northeast and the great lakes. >> it's like fall. i have my sweater under the desk, it's chilly. >> 24 hours ago i opened the windows in my house and last night i had to shut them. >> some people love it, but i say let summer run its course. >>> prince william prepares caring for his newborn to military duty. >>> who are the highest players in the nfl this year? >>> and a new study that shows which drivers are jerks. right now, 7 years of music is being streamed. a quarter million tweeters are tweeting. and 900 million dollars are changing hands online. that's why hp built a new kind of server. one that's 80% smaller. uses 89% less energy. and costs 77% less. it's called hp moonshot. and it's giving the internet the room it needs to grow. this&is gonna be big. hp moonshot. it's time to build a better enterprise. together. cheryl burke is cha-cha-ing in depend silhouette briefs for ch
nonviolent coordinating committee in greenwood, mississippi. she was on the staff of the march of washington. also, kweisi mfume. and the national editor for "vanity fair," the author of the upcoming book, "an idea whose time has come, two presidents, two parties and the battle for the civil rights act." thank you for joining me. congresswoman, i want to start with you. you have probably some very distinct memories. i was talking about the fact that for people who experienced it, it probably feels like yesterday. for people born after 1963, it feels like ancient history. take us to washington 1963 on that august day. >> well, 1963 was the high point of the civil rights movement in many ways. haven't worked on the staff of the march, being young and foolish, i expected a whole lot of people to come. but nobody really knew how many would come. what was really challenging was the unprecedented nature of the march. there had never been a mass march in washington, much less for civil rights. so if people asked me about what was the -- what do you remember most, frankly, it was not necessarily the
28th, 1955, emmett till was dragged from his cousin's home in mississippi and lynched. that lynching was part of what launched a civil rights movement. in 1963 on august 28th, dr. king stood and articulated a dream for the nation. on august 28th, 2008, president obama or then senator obama stood and accepted the nomination of the democratic party for the u.s. presidency. today, he will speak to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the march. from that lynching on august 28th to this moment of an african-american president on august 28th, there have been real accomplishments. there have been real changes. we have to acknowledge that, in fact, we have made progress as a country. at the same time, that we must absolutely recognize the continuing structural barriers that exist in terms of economic inequality, unfairness in the workplace, lack of opportunity in housing, often lack of opportunity in education from k through 12, as well as in higher education, and, of course, the realities of continuing residential segregation that impact everything from our health to our opportunities to ge
want to sound smart today, tell your friends nevada, utah, wyoming, alaska, hawaii, mississippi and alabama are the seven states in the u.s. that do not participate in the power ball drawing. of course a lot of people go over state lines to buy tickets. the most recent state to join, california, added in november of 2012. more news, although power ball isn't necessarily news. >>> stephen colbert has a dream of many dreams of being rescued by a celebrity and it almost came true last night. >> help! >> steven? stephen colbert? >> matt damon? thank god you're here. >> oifs just walking by, what happened to you, buddy, are you okay? >> you mean other than the vending machine? >> no, i'm not okay. this is so great, i have always wanted to be saved by a big star. >> wow, somebody call 911. >> you are big, right? >> yeah, however hollywood's measuring that this week. >> it's usually based on box office revenue. what was your latest movie? >> promised land. >> oh, yeah, the fracing movie? >> oh, i got to turn this off. yeah, no, it's me. >> i got -- >> wait, what? i'm on my way. jimmy k
in mississippi could not vote and those in new york believed that they had nothing for which to vote. today the united states supreme court having recently eviscerating the voting rights act and with numerous states clamoring to legislative codify voting suppression measures, not only must we not be satisfied, but we must fight back boldly. too many of our unknown heroes and sheroes fought for us to have the precious right for us to vote for us to sit back and timidly allow our franchise to be taken away or diminished. we must not rest until the congress of the united states restores the voting rights acted protections discarded by a supreme court blind to the blatant theft of the black vote. paramount to martin luther king junior's fervent dream was the commitment that african-americans gained full economic opportunity and not be confined to basic mobility from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. today with 12% unemployment rates in the african-american community and 38% of all children of color in this country living below the level of poverty, we know the dream is far from being realized.
in mississippi during the freedom ride. a bus was set on fire in alabama. we were beaten and arrested and jailed, but we helped bring an end to segregation in public transportation. i came back here again in june of 1963 with the big six as the new chairman of the student nonviolent coordinating committee. we met with president kennedy. in 1963, we could not register to vote simply because of the color of our skin. we had to pay a poll tax, pass a so-called literacy test, and count the number of jelly baean in a jar. hundreds of thousands of people were arrested in the south for trying to participate in the democratic process. medgar evers had been killed in mississippi, and that's why we told president kennedy we intended to march on washington to demonstrate the need for equal justice and equal opportunity in america. on august 28th, 1963, the nation's capital was in a state of emergency. thousands of troops surrounded the city. liquor stores were closed. but the march was so orderly, so peaceful. it was filled with dignity and self-respect because we believed in a way of peace, the way of lov
view is former mississippi governor ronnie muss grove of the chair of southern progress fund. a multistate pact that plans to ensure their resources are put towards democrats in the south. thank you for joining me today. >> thank you for having me. >> tell us about the plan you will be announcing tomorrow. >> we have all scent republicans take over the state legislature. and produce an agenda that would make strom thurmond blush. i sit back and think someone will lead the charge against this loonicy. it didn't happen. so we plan it change that. >> if we look at democratic shift, the emerging election torate we saw in 2008 and 2012 seems like it'll play a huge role in opportunities in the south. >> not only that, if you look at the actual numbers, for instance, in arkansas, we would only have to flip two seats in the house for it to go democrat. three in louisiana. four in mississippi. receiven in alabama. if you start looking at those numbers, and you look at the democratic -- demographic shields happening all across the south, i plef it is a great opportunity for us a to bui
on the death list in mississippi and he took it upon himself to train our children what to do in case they heard gunfire. that's exactly what they did that night. each other helped each other to the bathroom to get in the tub and my screams stopped them from completing that hiding point. but we knew, you live with death threats constantly and you adapt your life to that. you might argue, but you don't leave without the embrace. you might become angry with things that are happening around you, but it's a time of support. it's a time of pulling people together. and during that time, we had the ages divided. there were the young people and there were the older people. those in the middle were more or less teachers who were a little afraid to speak up and stand out. medgarr stood alone in that battle. he did have supporters, of course, but he was the point person and it was extremely difficult for us as a family to live with that. but you lived as though every day was going to be your last together. it sounds a little sad but that's the way it was. >> one of your themes in your speech on
secretary of the naacp in mississippi, civil rights leader medgar evers organized voter registration efforts. evers was assassinated in 1963 mere months before the march on washington. since then as a civil rights activist and former executive director of the naacp, his widow myrlie evers williams has carried on his legacy. she joins me sitting rights here, along with joy reid, manager the grio and msnbc contributor. i have been chasing after you, joy. i see you everywhere but here. now i've got you here finally. you are very smart about this stuff. and i know you're from the younger generation. i want to get myrlie on this too. i want you to react to this. a couple of things. it's not just minority voters that benefit from traditional voting patterns. the easier way to vote, younger people have a harder time budgeting their time. they just do for whatever reason. the easier it is to vote, the more are going to vote. african-american voters, many don't have money to have a car, don't have a driver's license, may be older living in row houses like i used to live as a kid, and they basically h
. because of that there are still flash flood warnings and regular warnings up and down the mississippi river because of the potential for more flooding. also the threat of severe storms from southeastern montana into parts of kansas where we could end up with large hail and damaging winds. a few tornadoes are possible but they should be brief. this is most likely later this afternoon and into this evening. the plains really do not need anymore rain right now. >> absolutely. it could be a busy weather day. >>> straight ahead, the fbi let informants commit over 5600 crimes. powerball is over $400 million. >>> a frightening report of what dirty car sellers are doing that only a trusted mechanic can save you from. "first look" is back in three. right now, 7 years of music is being streamed. a quarter million tweeters are tweeting. and 900 million dollars are changing hands online. that's why hp built a new kind of server. one that's 80% smaller. uses 89% less energy. and costs 77% less. it's called hp moonshot. and it's giving the internet the room it needs to grow. this&is gonna be big. h
flight delays. we do have flash flood watches and warnings up and down the mississippi river because of the additional rain that we'll also get today. we also have the threat of stronger storms like this afternoon into this evening. just to the east of the rockies into the western plains, biggest threat would be for damaging wind gusts and also for some small hail possible, isolated tornadoes are a possibility but not really a huge threat. temperatures today, really hot down south, well above 100 degrees. cool up north, especially in and around the great lakes region. tomorrow back into the mid 80s. 90s in kansas city. scattered showers and storms will spread into the east as we go into tomorrow. temperatures in the northeast will stay cool and comfortable for one more day. that heat will also spread eastward as we go into tomorrow. brian. >> dylan, thank you very much. going to sports stories, tiger woods looks pretty good going into the final major of the season. still number one in the world. don't forget that. he virtually lapped the field. it was kind of a joke. he took a seven-
georgia and areas of mississippi and alabama, too, especially the southern portions near the gulf as much as six to ten inches of rain over the next couple of days. by far the southeast is a travel trouble spot in the northeast if you left the windows open last night you may have had to close them in the middle of the night. we're in the mid-50s in the city, 40s in some of the suburbs. feels like fall but it will be a beautiful afternoon, thomas, we showed you d.c. there, i mean, you do vacations in d.c. mid-august, you're prepared for like heat, humidity, gross. 80 and low humidity enjoy it. >> i grew up in baltimore so i know all about gross, i do. bill thanks so much. >>> coming up at the top of the hour on "morning joe" we'll take you live to egypt as the military continues its crackdown on the muslim brotherhood protest. we'll discuss the options that remain for u.s. action. >>> and then we come back we huddle around the water cooler, a new tactic in the push to get san diego mayor bob filner out of office, the parcy video that you need to see and hear after this. right now, 7 years
till was found in mississippi. >>> an act of honesty caught on tape in northern new jersey. buddy's small lot was closed when a surveillance video shows four teens entering the store. instead of making off with batteries and ear phones, they leave carbon the counter, including sales tax. >> i think it's terrific that there are still people out there that have moral character not to do the wrong thing and they easily could. >> it seems a malfunctioning door lock is to blame after employees had gone home. the owners went looking for the young men to give them gift certificates, and they found them. four college football players who thank their parents. >> everything pays off. like good parenthoods and being around and showing me the ups and downs of things. you know, they showed me the right way to go. >> great group of guys there. >>> we do have some new photos of the man hunt of alleged boston bomber, dzhokhar tsarnaev. the photos show the sheer amount of manpower called in to find the suspect. the most gripping photos are from the standoff between police and tsarnaev showing him
against civil rights. the state of mississippi, which had given fdr something like 95% of the vote gave goldwater 84% in 1964, the guy who participated in the filibuster. >> then the voting rights act of '65 was so important because that changed the face of government in the united states. just like you may have handed the south over to the gop for all those decades, but you really changed -- you changed the united states of america, you know, i think as a result of the better. >> he might have changed party labels but we need to understand that, you know, racism is racism, no matter if it's a democrat or republican. so, the notion that he signed the party away for 30 years, you know, brings me back to the moment of, what's your responsibility of the civil rights leader? that that was a political calculation that lindyn lyndon made. so, yes, this may cost the democratic party, but eventually we believe it's going to benefit the nation. that's where we are today. >> it is interesting -- what it really did, we say it signed the south away for democrats. in a lot of ways it did. but it sor
of the eight states that are highest were louisiana, mississippi, states like this. one of the things that's interesting to me is the states that ended up lowest on the list were not the most liberal or coals mott policy tan. they were the whitest states, like north dakota, idaho, and northern new england. so there's this just lingering craziness that still exist it is out there. obviously there's a tactics to the take on votes rights, but we also have to consider the possibility and i think the president is sort of considering this that we're a bit more racist than we like to think. >> we're here in new york city where the stop-and-frisk, the fact that the judge sheindlin has rule that stop and frisk is unconstitutional, hats given rights to a huge debate about whether people of color truly are treated equally. you have mayor bloomberg say this policy is good for minority communities and you have a judge who says it's unstill independents and african-americans have been saying for decades that profiling is wrong and feels wrong, and it reduces -- there's been this unwillingness to tackle
from lookout mountain, from every hill and molehill from mississippi. from every mountain side, let freedom ring, there is in the scope and grandeur and fragrance of those words the very picture of this land, and this remarkable man managed to raise up civil rights as american rights, as american as the land god gave us. that's "hardball" for now. thanks for being with us. "politics nation" with al sharpton starts right now. \s. >>> i'm live tonight from washington, d.c. tonight's lead, a taste of their own medicine. president obama hit the road today with a message aimed at republicans he es had enough. >> we've seen a faction of republicans in congress that suggest that maybe america shouldn't pay its bills that have already been run up, that we should shut down government if they could shut down obama care. you know, that won't grow our economy, that won't cede jobs, that won't help our middle class. >>> he's right, we could afford it. what doesn't the gop understand? the law was passed, signed into law, upset by the supreme court, reaffirmed by the election. bron chanting. >> ge
. >> when the mississippi in southwest georgia and alabama, in harlem, chicago, philadelphia, and all over this nation the blacks are on the march for freedom. >> plus the force of labor vital to the civil rights movement, vital to the success of the march on washington. and as we go to break, the beat of music at the heart of the day. gospel singer mahalia jackson and her rendition of "how i got over" went down in history. ♪ how did we make it over ♪ look back in wonder how we made it over ♪ ♪ tell me how we got over the boys used double miles from their capital one venture card to fly home for the big family reunion. you must be garth's father? hello. mother. mother! traveling is easy with the venture card because you can fly any airline anytime. two words. double miles! this guy can act. wanna play dodge rock? oh, you guys! and with double miles you can actually use, you never miss the fun. beard growing contest and go! ♪ i win! what's in your wallet? his day of coaching begins with knee pain, when... [ man ] hey, brad, want to trade the all-day relief of two aleve for six tyl
hill of mississippi. you know that portion of the speech, right? at the 50-year anniversary of that moment at 3:00 p.m. tomorrow, bells are going to ring in d.c. and across the country and even apparently in places as far away as switzerland and japan. that's tomorrow afternoon. here's the other thing you need to know for tomorrow, though. even if you're not in a place where you can watch tv during the day, take a note of this for tomorrow night. this is something that never happens. tomorrow night, wednesday night at 8:00 p.m. eastern, msnbc has moved heaven and earth to get permission to air the "i have a dream" speech uninterrupted in its entirety. you think you have heard the whole speech, but you really probably haven't. access to the tape of the speech is very, very highly restricted. it is almost impossible to get permission to play even any large piece of it, let alone the whole thing. but tomorrow here on msnbc, at 8:00 p.m., we have moved heaven and earth to be able to play "i have a dream" uninterrupted in full. you should plan to not miss it. this is not somethin
white men in mississippi for flirting with a white woman. he was tortured and beaten and shot in the head. the murderers were acquitted and months later they admitted to the killing. a day never to forget. but today we also remember a hopeful day. five years ago today, senator barack obama accepted the democratic nomination for president in 2008. the arc of history bending toward justice. that's why we in our own way must never stop marching, never stop fighting, never stop doing whatever it is we can do. because at the end, right will always overpower wrong. and as the president quoted an old gospel song today, weeping may endure for a night. but if you keep going, joy will definitely come in the morning. we need to keep going because there are mornings that are waiting us if we would just fight through the night. i'm al sharpton. thank you for watching. "hardball" starts right now. >>> a question of character. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in washington. the content of his character. remember that great line in martin luther king's speech? r
think it's like meals on wheels. you take big issues like social security. in rural areas of mississippi and alabama where there are a lot of poor people of both backgrounds black and white, they aren't on plantations. these are workers. and they really care about these basic social programs. and yet obama fights for them and they don't ally with them. >> they don't. and they think they will be better off on their own. >> i know you're friends with bill cosby and i in ways worship the guy. here's when the president didn't get away from delivering a tough message. he didn't sound like the lefty socialist his critics on the right portray him as. here he is. >> if we're honest with ourselves, we'll admit that during the course of 50 years, there were times when some of us claiming to push for change lost our way. the anguish of assassinations set off self-defeating riots. legitimate grievances against police brutality tipped into excuse making for criminal behavior. and what had once been a call for equality of opportunity, the chance for all americans to work hard and get ahead was too oft
lou in greenwood, mississippi, james orange an activist in birmingham, alabama. jose williams. i thought of those people, i thought of baker, and so when i thought of them, i began to cry. i began to cry, because i knew that there contribution had changed america, by the way, i said this directly to the president of the united states. i reminded him yesterday when i had the honor to see him in the reception, even when he was out in california. i -- and you know, he knows this, that when he was elected, for example and there were several people at a faculty home celebrating the election of barack obama. and people in the room started to cry, and someone said to me, professor jones, did you think you live long enough to see an african-american elected president? i said no. but excuse me, my tears are not for the election of barack obama's president. my tears are for all of those persons that i personally knew, personally knew -- i called them wintertime soldiers, who made his election possible. and the president today and even earlier, he reflected that in the very poignant and mov
-old emmitt till was murdered by two white men in mississippi for flirting with a white woman. he was tortured and beaten and shot in the head. the murderers were acquitted and months later they admitted to the killing. a day never to forget. but today we also remember a hopeful day. five years ago today, senator barack obama accepted the democratic nomination for president in 2008. the arc of history bending toward justice. that's why we in our own way must never stop marching, never stop fighting, never stop doing whatever it is we can do. because at the end, right will always overpower wrong. and as the president quoted an old gospel song today, weeping may endure for a night. but if you keep going, joy will definitely come in the morning. we need to keep going because there are mornings that are waiting us if we would just fight through the night. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now.
in meridian, mississippi in an integrated school. and went to school at university of alabama at a very integrated campus and at a campus that in the 1980s was actually handling racial issues a lot better than a lot of campuses across the northeast. but martin luther king not only did for america but what he did for his home region of the south, a region that had been scarred by racism and racial tensions for years. to see how quickly things -- he gave this speech the year i was born in a segregated south and segregated america. by the time i started first grade in meridian mississippi it w was integrated. that is nothing short of extraordinary and that is a legacy that we put first at the feet of martin luther king and also all the civil rights workers and protesters and leaders who gave their all to make sure that white children like myself and black children who were my friends, who i played football with in first grade and baseball with in first grade, would go to school together. that was the normal. that was normal for me. let me -- al, let me go to you quickly here. it is incredi
, mississippi, south carolina, texas and virginia -- decided to push forward with voter suppression efforts that could disenfranchise hundreds of thousands of americans. weeks later, other states have followed suit, including north carolina whose legislature just passed the nation's most restrictive voting law in the country. even as the justice department has taken action to combat suppression, attorney general eric holder has acknowledged that it is "no substitute for legislation that will fill the void left by the supreme court's decision." last week, president obama met with civil rights leaders to reassure them that his administration would vigorously fight to preserve voting rights. while voting rights of millions hangs in the balance, the president sounded a cautious note of optimism saying the voting rights act is not dead, it is not even critical, it is just wounded. joining us now, president of the national urban league, mark morial. >> thanks for having me. >> in this momentous almost anniversary. >> we're seeing a concerted effort that really began before the 2012 election to re
to him happened in mississippi in 195 5. he was 14. a lot of people see this film and think about our new cycle stand your ground and stop and frisk and trayvon martin and brings up that talking point is there justice right now? really great part in the film where they talk about, you know, the young seizele gaicecil gain. he is saying the law was against us and not on our side. i think trayvon martin's family and other people would feel that way today. >> "the butler" takes a look at the inner workings at the white house in the past. we know oprah has modern day ties to this white house, the obama administration. listen to this. >> look at all of those administrations compared to obama. i mean, obama will stand alone because of what that represented for the country. i was so pleased that during the process of this interview, a white reporter sitting in the very chair you're sitting in saying he didn't realize until seeing this movie the depth of the importance of obama, but seeing that movie in the context of the civil rights movement, now allows him to see, wow, that is really bigger th
trying, sir, to talk some sense over this proposed government shutdown. mississippi governor phil bryant tells "the new york times," and i'm quoting, we believe in eliminating obama care completely but at some point, perhaps we have to realize that the federal government because of the support of our military, support of our public safety, our infrastructure, wiig have to have a budget." but will senator cruz and his cohort listen? >> well, i don't think we know that yet. look, john mccain is saying the same thing. tom cole who is very conservative who is in the house leadership is saying the same thing. it would be a disaster for the republicans to shut down the government. they did it in 1995. those guys were there. they saw that it was a political train wreck. i think boehner understands this, the house speaker. i think mcconnell understands this, but boehner wants to be called speaker, not ex-speaker. mcconnell faces a primary in kentucky. so i don't think that we can be certain about what's going to happen here. if they do shut down the government and they'll be blamed for it, if th
. met with a famous college basketball team that helped a white university of mississippi team play their first game against african-americans. this of course meeting with some living negro leaguers, the most famous of which is miniminoso. he played in the majors, ron tinsley had some minor league time. but what was interesting about the conversation when it turned to a-rod was this whole issue of these guys seem to have had it. and what's interesting now, you see current players saying the same thing. they're all like, you know what? clean this support up and they're not happy with a-rod heer either. >> tell me your impression of what's going on with this steroid -- first of all, what did they call a performance enhancing drug in your day? coffee? >> coffee. you lucky. and before, we're not making enough to maybe buy one bottle of dom perignon. i remember they used to be tough, people with alcohol and never in my life -- nothing to this day to my life. i never took drugs in my life. not even smoking. before allvy in my mind about how to play tomorrow and i haven't done anything bef
on the show, it's no longer them, it's us. you know, i had a farmer from the delta of mississippi. he said i want to identify myself. i'm a white listener. i'm a farmer, and i'm here to tell you we are so upset with the republicans for what they're doing, trying to tie the food stamp into the farm bill. you had bennie thompson, who said as many of the members of the caucus said for the first time in 20 years, they had to vote against the farm bill. people are seeing that these individuals are going against the best interests of their own party. >> there is no doubt about it. i'm going have to leave it there. >> yeah. adults will speak up, al. >> nia-malika henderson and joe madison, thank you for your time tonight. >> thank you. >> thank you, rev. >>> coming up, the gop's newest plan to go after hillary clinton. we've seen this scary movie. [ male announcer ] running out of steam? ♪ now you can give yourself a kick in the rear! v8 v-fusion plus energy. natural energy from green tea plus fruits and veggies. need a little kick? ooh! could've had a v8. in the juice aisle. >>> the gop takes th
/rural divide and when you look at the whites in a state like mississippi and alabama and exit polls last year and 2008 as well, 90%-plus for romney and the voting in the states is basically black, democratic and white, republican. that is what it is down there. >> and part of that is that the democrats have not shown up and made our arguments in the south. that is a big, and the southern progress fund that is part of what they are trying to rectify. if all you hear is vitriol that is on one side of the argument, and if we are not there. alvin greene was our candidate for senate in south carolina, and people say, it is pointless and we will never win, and my point is just that we are never going to effect change if we are not there to at least make the case and show something different. >> that is the legacy of redistricting, too, because the democrats no longer feel they have to campaign or spread a moderate progressive message in that part of the country. and michael, this information is coming to day after the president was in arizona and had protesters outside of one of his speeches singin
, minnesota, minnesota, georgia, florida. i point out mississippi, minnesota, georgia, and florida. we know the stereotypes that probably are quite true when you look at the food culture of some of those southern states. >> the southeast does struggle. i come from a long line of obesity. i think the real message is it doesn't matter where you live. it doesn't matter if your mother, grandmother, father, aunts, uncles, in my case, they're all obese. that doesn't mean i have to be obese. we're seeing a transition. >> so preschool the study was followed preschoolers. that is such a smart move. that's where it has to happen. >> i want to read the first lady's response to the numbers. she says today's announcement reaffirms my belief that together we are making a real difference in helping kids across the country get a healthier start to life. i see it as a balance of kids. you can play the video games but you can go on your bike. >>> i know it's not always easy to nurse. it was tricky. i had a lifestyle that made it doable for me. so i hope that i'm so glad to see more women nursing. i'm so glad
in mississippi and make you jump through hoops. the shwag the federal government is growing isn't that good anyway and doesn't let you study a lot of different strains. it could be so simple and easy to do actual scientific research on marijuana but the government stands in the way. >> where is the obama administration on this part of the question? where has the obama administration been on the scientific question here? >> scientifically they've been great. they've said, look, we're not going to get in the way of the states. this is what they've said. the states that have passed medical marijuana laws. in practice, the d.e.a. has been kicking in doors in california, washingt washington, montana, colorado. wherever there's a medical marijuana law, there are u.s. attorneys there spending a lot of time and resources to try to tackle what they see as a problem. it takes six to nine months, a former administration official told me, to run one of these investigations on a pot shop. these pot shops are advertising in the yellowbook and in the alt weeklies and have store fronts with pot leaves on t
been covered, texas, mississippi and alabama, ushered in photo id requirements that had been previously held at bay by the voting rights act. weakening opportunities and broadening id requirements any day. and now there's florida where five counties had been covered by the voting rights act, the republican governor is restarting an effort that he says is designed to purge the voter roles of noncitizens but that a lot of people believe is an attempt to purge the roles of democrats. when rick scott tried this last year, he was stopped by the voting rights act. last time as the "new york times" reports the attempt at unearthing noncitizens initially began with a pool of 182,000 names of potential noncitizens. that was wid ld to a list of 2,600. those names were sent to election supervisors who found many were in fact citizens and ultimately the list of possible noncitizen voters shrank to 198. of those fewer than 40 had voted illegally. we'd like to remind you of one of the people who was caught in the dragnet. >> bill, a 91-year-old army veteran of world war ii who earned the bronze star
anybody. instead they're sending those same people to help the economy of georgia and mississippi and elsewhere. and so we have seen in alabama alone the real effects of not having comprehensive immigration reform. >> representative terri sewell, thank you so much for joining us this afternoon, ma'am. >> thanks. >> coming up, more on the presidential news conference as we shift our focus to the war on terror. stay with us. good job! still running in the morning? yeah. getting your vegetables every day? when i can. [ bop ] [ male announcer ] could've had a v8. two full servings of vegetables for only 50 delicious calories. yeah? then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. silence. are you in good hands? plays a key role throughout our lives. one a day women's 50+ is a complete multivitamin designed for women's health concerns as we age. with 7 antioxidants to support cell health. one a day women's 50+. >>> among the wide range of topics covered in today's news conference was russia's recentl
. mississippi has just the one clinic in jackson. that one, the republicans are fighting to close that one down as well and it seems like they may be close to doing it. in north dakota, same deal. there's one clinic for the whole great big state. this spring republicans passed a law that aims to shut down that one last clinic. in alabama, there are five clinics that provide abortion services. republicans passed laws in the spring that would close three of the five clinics. in virginia, the number of clinics right now is at 20. it's slated to go to four. in north carolina, 16 facilities, republicans passed new restrictions that are expected to close 15 of those. 15 of the 16. so this is before the republican party in north carolina launched its efforts to shut down clinics and this is likely to be after. it is sometimes difficult to explain this larger trend of republicans creating these new impossible to meet demands on abortion clinics. these legal requirements designed to shut clinics down. in the aning a stran ing ing a, imagine what that means. in the specific, when it's happening it seems
feel like they can go ahead. so texas first. maybe alabama. maybe mississippi. maybe north carolina after today. sometimes you use the bully pulpit. sometimes you have the authority to weigh in and stop something directly. sometimes when you lose that authority, as justice department did during the, with the voting rights act case. sometimes when you lose that authority, you instead decide you're going to sue. what is the range of options available to you? and how do you use it? how do you still try to make progress when some avenues toward the progress you want to make are blocked? on the issue of drugs and criminal justice, the obama administration made it a priority to try to reduce the huge disparity in sentencing for crack cocaine versus powder cocaine. i mean, if cocaine is the problem, why be so much more lenient for one variety of cocaine and so much more strict for the other? o on that issue, the administration found a lot of allies in congress. the build to reduce those sentencing disparities between crack cocaine and powder cocaine, that bill passed by a voice vote in the
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